What are the 3 major functions of the nervous system?

What are the 3 main functions of the nervous system quizlet?

Terms in this set (3)

  • sensory input. when sensory receptors monitor changes that occur both inside and outside of the body.
  • integration. when sensory information is interpreted and the appropriate response is taken.
  • motor output. response that is performed by effectors- muscles or glands.

What are the functions of the nervous system?

Your nervous system is your body’s command center. Originating from your brain, it controls your movements, thoughts and automatic responses to the world around you. It also controls other body systems and processes, such as digestion, breathing and sexual development (puberty).

What are the 4 main functions of the nervous system?

The four main functions of the nervous system are:

  • Control of body’s internal environment to maintain ‘homeostasis’ An example of this is the regulation of body temperature. …
  • Programming of spinal cord reflexes. An example of this is the stretch reflex. …
  • Memory and learning. …
  • Voluntary control of movement.

What are the 3 parts of the peripheral nervous system?

The Peripheral Nervous System (PNS)

  • Autonomic nervous system (ANS): Controls involuntary bodily functions and regulates glands.
  • Somatic nervous system (SNS): Controls muscle movement and relays information from ears, eyes and skin to the central nervous system.
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What are the three types of neurons and what are their functions?

In terms of function, scientists classify neurons into three broad types: sensory, motor, and interneurons.

  • Sensory neurons. Sensory neurons help you: …
  • Motor neurons. Motor neurons play a role in movement, including voluntary and involuntary movements. …
  • Interneurons.

What is the main function of the nervous system quizlet?

The primary function of the nervous system is to collect a multitude of sensory information; process, interpret, and integrate that information; and initiate appropriate responses throughout the body.