Can a child with ADHD be clever?

Can high IQ look like ADHD?

Misdiagnosis is not uncommon when high IQ and ADHD collide. Very bright children who are also highly active are sometimes misdiagnosed with ADHD. On the other hand, some highly intelligent children with ADHD can focus on things that interest them for an extended period of time, which can lead to misdiagnosis as well.

Can you have ADHD and be gifted?

ADHD AND GIFTEDNESS are sometimes described as having the same or similar characteristics. However, one diagnosis is considered a disability and one, a gift. Neither assumption is ideal in supporting the child identified with either ADHD, giftedness, or both, often referred to as twice exceptional or 2e.

Can ADHD do well in school?

Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can achieve success in school when they get the accommodations they’re entitled to. ADHD affects about 11 percent of American children.

Are private schools good for ADHD?

Many good public and private schools provide academic support and deal effectively with ADHD. Since the universe of special education schools is small, and since they are not present in many areas, you will have many more school choices if your child can manage in a regular school setting.

Does ADHD affect IQ scores?

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with lower than average intelligence quotient (IQ) scores. However, research done on this disorder often excludes participants based on lower than average IQ’s (i.e., between 70 and 85).

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Do you get money for a child with ADHD?

If your child has been diagnosed with ADHD, or ADD, he or she can qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability benefits if the severity of the child’s ADHD meets the Social Security Administration’s childhood impairment listing for neurodevelopmental disorders (listing 112.11).

What are the negatives of ADHD?

Effects of ADHD

  • Social isolation.
  • Decreased scholastic and job performance.
  • Inability to form lasting bonds with others.
  • Dropping out of school.
  • Teen pregnancy.
  • Motor vehicle accidents.
  • Increased risk-taking behaviors.
  • Depression.