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Mental Health (43 found)
All stories originally appeared in Youth Communication magazines: YCteen, which is written by New York City public high school students, and Represent which is written by and for youth in foster care.
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Paris gets shuttled around foster care feeling unloved and unlistened to. Ms. Howard is the first foster mother to ask him what makes him comfortable, and she earns his trust. (full text)
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When J.G. finally gets her own apartment at age 22, she thinks everything's finally OK. Instead, her years in care haunt her. (full text)
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Psychotherapists Sylvia Lester and Marina Stolerman of The Fostering Connection give tips on how to make a house or apartment a home and how to live on your own. (full text)
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A.C. goes into care and gets put on powerful psychotropic drugs. She is sad and lonely, but not, she tells her therapist, mentally ill. (full text)
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Dr. Fadi Haddad explains why and how he makes the decision to put psychiatric patients younger than 18 on psychotropic medication. (full text)
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Victor describes the methods he's used to control his anxiety and depression, including therapy, medication, exercise, and mindfulness. (full text)
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The author has trouble paying attention in school. She is put on various drugs, but educational and emotional supports end up helping her more. (full text)
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Natasha interviews therapist Rebecca Weston about how to keep family trauma in your past from messing up your new relationships. (full text)
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Lavell shares her experience of applying for, then choosing between low-income public housing and supportive housing for mentally ill New Yorkers. (full text)
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After having suicidal thoughts and cutting herself, V.N. is committed to a psychiatric hospital, but she doesn't think she's crazy. Harming herself seems to help her escape the trauma of sexual abuse. (full text)
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Young adults who weren't taught as children how to handle difficult emotions are more likely to develop mental health issues as adults. (full text)
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Trauma is an experience so upsetting that the mind cannot make sense of it. By learning to tell the story of your trauma through therapy, you can begin to put it behind you. (full text)
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Therapy and trusting relationships with people can help teens manage stress and difficult emotions, and recover from childhood trauma. (full text)
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Cynthia experiences panic attacks and dissociation, a foggy state where her mind separates from her body. A therapist helps her realize that these are defenses against trauma from the past, which she can now begin to face. (full text)
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Dr. John DiLallo describes how psychotropic medications work, why they can be helpful, and also their limitations. (full text)
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A therapist explains why therapy is important, how it works, and why it can be better than talking to a friend or family member. (full text)
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Represent writers share tips on how to relieve stress, from meditation to writing to watching comedies. (full text)
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Otis is teased in school because he has cerebral palsy. He attempts suicide, then uses therapy to find better ways to communicate and express his anger. (full text)
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Shameeka interviews a psychologist about how teens can deal with loss. (full text)
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As a child, Natasha escaped into an imaginary world to deal with pain. Now she wonders if the habit has outworn its usefulness. (full text)
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Aquellah works hard in therapy to release her inner child—the feelings and longings she was never allowed to express. (full text)
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Natasha interviews a therapist to explain how therapy works and why it’s important for kids who’ve suffered trauma. (full text)
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Maya has been in therapy for years, but has had a hard time finding a therapist she feels comfortable with. (full text)
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La’Quesha learns about a kind of therapy, CBT, that helps people change their behavior by changing how they think about it. (full text)
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Because of an abusive past, the writer dissociates from reality and cuts herself. Yet she has the tiniest bit of hope that all is not lost. (full text)
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Dr. Alexandra Barzvi, a psychologist at the New York University Child Study Center, explains how depression affects teens and how it can be treated. (full text)
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The author finds cutting helps her deal with a painful relationship with her father. Therapy, writing, music, and talking to others help her stop. (full text)
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To deal with her abusive past, Christine mentally dissociates and begins to cut herself. Letting out her feelings helps her stay present.
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A therapist explains why people cut themselves and how they may be able to stop. (full text)
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Charlene explores why foster youth are often resistant to therapy. (full text)
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Gloria enjoys therapy until she’s switched to a therapist she doesn’t like and is put on medication that makes her feel like a “lab animal.” (full text)
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A therapist describes the pros and cons of anti-depressant medication. (full text)
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A psychiatrist talks about the pros and cons of medication and therapy. (full text)
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The writer interviews two mental health experts on how to help a friend who is depressed. (full text)
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Like many people, Troy feels a little depressed and disoriented during the winter months. It's called Seasonal Affective Disorder, and he explains its symptoms and ways to deal with it. (full text)
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Megan has always been an obsessive thinker and worrier, but when her anxiety threatens her friendships, she consults a psychologist and begins to understand her anxieties. (full text)
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Natasha asks a therapist to explain how anger from the past can affect your future. (full text)
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The author interviews a social worker about the symptoms, causes, and treatment of mental illness. (full text)
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Miguel describes the programs that have tried to help him manage his emotions, and explains what works and what doesn’t. (full text)
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Alina suffers through a terrible depression, but she’s determined to fight back. A counselor and her family help her feel less alone. (full text)
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The writer lives in a violent home and has to physically break up fights between her parents. She compensates by becoming the perfect kid, but her empty feelings lead to hallucinations and she starts seeing a counselor. (full text)
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Christina cuts to relieve her depression, but she feels guilty afterward and wants to stop. Eventually, she finds she can feel OK without hurting herself. (full text)
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When Samira is sent to a mental hospital she feels trapped, until a sympathetic social worker helps her open up. (full text)

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