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Abuse (32 found)
All stories originally appeared in Youth Communication magazines: YCteen, which is written by New York City public high school students, and Represent which is written by and for youth in foster care.
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The author, frustrated by abuse and unfairness, fights. After hitting a pregnant girl, she realizes she must stop and does, with the help of yoga, running, and therapy. (full text)
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At age 15, Alesha is seduced and then abused by a predator in his 30s. She details how he manipulated her, then how she got free and repaired her damaged self-worth. (full text)
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Chris suffers abuse at home, including his adoptive mom not accepting his gender identity. He nearly gives up on school, but in a small school for kids with emotional challenges, he thrives. (full text)
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Selena's early life is full of abuse and cruelty. She is adopted by a loving family at age 16 and learns about consistency, connection, and working through problems. (full text)
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The author is forced by her mother and stepfather to be the maid and nanny to her younger half-siblings. In kinship care, she's allowed to be a child again. (full text)
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The author was physically and emotionally abused. When she ages out of care, she finds that years of being put down keep her from going after work or college. (full text)
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The author keeps giving her violent, abusive mom another chance, and her mom keeps letting her down. She finally resolves to separate and move forward on her own. (full text)
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Selena suffers terrible abuse from an early age, then is moved to 16 different foster homes in two years. Then she finds a foster mother who sticks with her and eventually adopts her. (full text)
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This writer’s first sexual encounter with a boy is nothing like the romantic experience she envisioned. When he doesn't listen to her refusal, she kicks him out. (full text)
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The author gains weight and is bullied. She briefly tries throwing up her food, until she has a health scare and takes off the weight slowly with exercise and healthy diet. (full text)
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The author is raised by a volatile and abusive mother. When she finds herself acting like her mother and screaming at her boyfriend, she is appalled. She gets therapy. (full text)
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The writer is being abused at home, but doesn't share that secret with anyone. She bonds with a teacher at school, who offers support and love when the writer needs it most. (full text)
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Kicked out of the house by her mother, the writer goes to live with her father. Although life's not perfect, she realizes she shouldn't blame herself for a situation over which she had no control. (full text)
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After having suicidal thoughts and cutting herself, V.N. is committed to a psychiatric hospital, but she doesn't think she's crazy. Harming herself seems to help her escape the trauma of sexual abuse. (full text)
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Young adults who weren't taught as children how to handle difficult emotions are more likely to develop mental health issues as adults. (full text)
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Therapy and trusting relationships with people can help teens manage stress and difficult emotions, and recover from childhood trauma. (full text)
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For years, V.N. is sexually and physically abused by her father. She goes into foster care, grapples with cutting and suicide attempts, and finds some relief from talk therapy and antidepressants. (full text)
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As a child, Natasha escaped into an imaginary world to deal with pain. Now she wonders if the habit has outworn its usefulness. (full text)
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Aquellah works hard in therapy to release her inner child—the feelings and longings she was never allowed to express. (full text)
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Natasha interviews a therapist to explain how therapy works and why it’s important for kids who’ve suffered trauma. (full text)
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Because of an abusive past, the writer dissociates from reality and cuts herself. Yet she has the tiniest bit of hope that all is not lost. (full text)
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Diagnosed with borderline personality disorder, Erica learns to manage her emotions through therapy and medication. (full text)
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To deal with her abusive past, Christine mentally dissociates and begins to cut herself. Letting out her feelings helps her stay present.
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A therapist explains why people cut themselves and how they may be able to stop. (full text)
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Growing up in a violent, dysfunctional household, Linda becomes depressed and suicidal. Therapy helps her express her feelings. (full text)
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At a youth shelter, the author gets connected with a good therapist who helps him release his anger over the abuse he suffered as a child. (full text)
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With the help of staff, Tray finds less destructive ways to deal with his emotions. (full text)
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After being arrested for assault, Fred is sent to a residential treatment center, where he eventually learns ways to deal with his anger and his violent past. (full text)
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An abusive past has left Natasha with anger and panic attacks. (full text)
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Physically abused by his mother, Miguel takes out his anger on others by being a bully and on himself by attempting suicide. (full text)
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Miguel describes the programs that have tried to help him manage his emotions, and explains what works and what doesn’t. (full text)
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Julie finds that opening up about her feelings helps her to deal with them in more constructive ways. (full text)

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